Fitting In Gets the Job | Jobs In DE

Fitting In Gets the Job

By: Margaret Hansen

What's Wrong?

You qualify for the position and you're satisfied with the compensation, so, why don't you want the job?

Red Flags

Something about it doesn't feel right and you can't put your finger on it, but you're not comfortable with a number of events, including:

  • Their applicant tracking process made you feel like a number and undermined your confidence that they care about employees.
  • They let it slip that they were undergoing changes that could put the job you were applying for in jeopardy of major changes.
  • You met the team in a series of interviews and couldn't relate to any of them.
  • You've received a number of emails from them late at night, indicating that, in their culture, people work late.

Read how your personality scores you the most interview points.

These red flags are the most subjective part of your job hunt - it's up to you if they are bothersome - yet they are the most important, and they provide insight into what you think is important. If the job isn't the right "fit" for you, it's not the job for you.

Priorities

So how do you determine what job would fit? You can start by making a list.

"I suggest that job seekers take the time to list all the aspects of their perfect job: duties, potential for advancement, location, pay, hours, environment, type of company, etc.," says Barbara Hart of HireWell. "Once you've created that list, refer to it often. If you've worked in a corporate setting and your dream job is at Unum, you don't want to accept a position at a small locally owned firm with 10 people. You won't be happy there."

When interviewing at companies, keep your list of priorities in mind, and ask questions that provide insight into those priorities that matter most to you.

Learn More

Read how JobsInTheUS.com hires for fit.


Margaret Hansen has been writing professionally since receiving a bachelor's degree in journalism from the University of Maine. She has worked for multiple organizations as a weekly newspaper reporter, a weekly newspaper editor, and in a variety of internal/external marketing communications roles. Her freelance career has focused on writing and editing for print, email and web publications in the employment industry, as well as manuscript editing and resume writing.