Moving Out of Your Comfort Zone | Jobs In DE

Moving Out of Your Comfort Zone

By Diane Dunton, PotentialReleased.com

A reader asks, "I recently took a position with an affiliate of a company that I want to work for - thinking it would be my way in the door to the larger entity, which has a great reputation for treating their employees well and educating/training them to move up in the organization.

"It didn't work out, and after seven months of trying to work within a difficult (hostile) management style on their part, my employment was ended. I still, however, need to be able to work for the larger entity. How should I handle this?"

Letting Go

I tried something new recently: snowshoeing. In doing this, I had to give up the nice glide of my cross-country skis. I did ask for snowshoes for Christmas, but once I had them in my possession, I was not sure I really wanted them.

I began asking myself all sorts of questions. Would I like them? Would they be too much work? Would I miss my cross-country skis? Should I try at all?

I set the questions aside and decided to pursue this new winter activity. The day I chose happened to be a mild January day in Maine and much of the snow had melted. I convinced my husband that it was a good day for snowshoeing and off we went.

Much to our surprise, our new adventure lasted two hours! We took a nice trail with enough snow for us to move along at a good pace. I was able to take some great photos of geese and other winter scenes. It ended up being a great time.

What if I had let all of those questions stop me from trying? What if I had stayed in my comfort zone? Moving out of our comfort zone is not always easy. It's even harder when a decision is made for us. When the change is forced, it is often much more difficult to let go.

Examine the Situation

In terms of the readers' situation, the first question to ask is, "What were the circumstances of leaving? Would I receive a positive recommendation if I apply for a position with the parent company?"

If you think you will receive a positive recommendation, than network with people you know in the parent company. Keep positive connections. Make sure you look at other companies, too.

If you do not think you will receive a positive recommendation from anyone at the company that dismissed you, than it may be time to let go and move on. This is harder, but may prove to be the better career option. In moving on, you must make sure you let go of any anger you may feel towards the company and individuals that work there. Anger can come through in a future interview. Find someone you can talk to about it, so any feelings of anger will be resolved.

Accepting Change

Moving on and out of our comfort zone is not always easy. Letting go can be difficult. A great reminder of what happens when we hold on too long is the book, Who Moved My Cheese by Spencer Johnson.

About the Author:

Diane L. Dunton, MS, president of Potential Released Consulting Services since 1996, has over 25 years of business and HR experience. Diane has received specialized training with National Training Labs, the Gestalt Institute, Center for Creative Leadership, the University of Michigan's Organizational Career Development and the Center for Reengineering Leadership programs. She has developed programs for over 25,000 employees and leads more than 20 workshops annually offering executive coaching, professional individual coaching and programs on leadership and strategic planning. She has appeared before conferences of up to 9,000 participants and her work has appeared in both U.K. and U.S. management publications, including the Society for Training and Development's Team and Organizational Development Sourcebooks (2003-2006).Learn more about Diane at PotentialReleased.com.

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Diane L. Dunton M.S., president of Potential Released Consulting Services since 1996, has over 25 years of business and HR experience. Diane has received specialized training with National Training Labs, the Gestalt Institute, Center for Creative Leadership, the University of Michigan's Organizational Career Development and the Center for Reengineering Leadership programs. She has developed programs for over 25,000 employees and leads more than 20 workshops annually offering executive coaching, professional individual coaching and programs on leadership and strategic planning. She has appeared before conferences of up to 9,000 participants and her work has appeared in both U.K. and U.S. management publications, including the Society for Training and Development's Team and Organizational Development Sourcebooks (2003-2006).Learn more about Diane at PotentialReleased.com.